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20121112
20121120
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)
want to take you back to the live camera positions. this is outside of the white house and john boehner taking the microphone and let's listen in. >> by significant spending cuts. and while we're going to continue to have revenue on the table, it is going to be incumbent for my colleagues to show the american people that we're serious about cutting spending and solving our fiscal dilemma. i believe that we can do this and avert the fiscal cliff that right in front of us today. >> this isn't the first time we have dealt with these issues. we feel we understand what the problem is. we felt very -- i feel very good about what we were able to talk about in there. we have a cornerstones of being able to work something out. we're both going to have to give up some of the things that we know are a problem. and so it is like when we arrive at a point where we all know something has to be done, there is no more let's do it some other time or we're going to do it now and i think there is we feel very comfortable with each other and this isn't something we're going to wait until the last day of de
that we've seen since the election, whether it's from the president or the house speaker john boehner, but i can tell you in talking to sources privately on both sides of the aisle, they admit that it's all about positioning and posturing to make sure at the end of the day if we do go off the fiscal cliff that they're not blamed for it. they're the ones who looked reasonable, not unreasonable, and they're preparing for the other side to blame them for the opposite, if that makes sense. that's a lot of what you are saying in public. the reality is that neither side has a really clear machine date or clear vote and no one wants to look at the end of the day like they never gave compromise a chance. listen to republican bob corker, though, because there does seem to be a little bit of a crack on the republican side on whether or not it's okay to raise some taxes. >> i think there is a deal. the ying and yang is we know there has to be revenues, and i think -- look, i haven't met a wealthy republican or democrat in tennessee that's not willing to contribute more as long as they know we so
when you saw nancy pelosi out there. you saw john boehner out there saying we are hopeful we can get a deal done. and the market had a positive reaction to that. yet it lost that upside throughout the day, teetered back and forth between positive and negative territory. finally, closing the day out positive, so perhaps that suggests that maybe we are a little bit closer. but here's the thing, randi, they've got to get something done. they've got to solve this issue. because if not, the consequences are severe. >> but you listen to some people, and they suggest that fears of fallen off the cliff are overblown. what are the real consequences here? >> the real consequences are another recession. i mean, i can tell you every ceo that i'm talking to right now says i'm not making major decisions. i'm waiting. i'm standing by the sidelines. i can't hire a lot of people, i can't invest in a lot of infrastructure because i don't know what the landscape is going to be in the next 45 days. i don't know what the landscape is going to be in the next three months. so there's a lot of holdup. now,
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)